Becoming a U.S. Citizen Through Naturalization

For many immigrants, the ultimate goal is to become a citizen of the United States. The immigration laws of the U.S. provide immigrants with a path to realizing this dream by going through the naturalization process. There are many important issues to consider when applying for naturalization.

The Path to Citizenship

In order to apply for naturalization, you must already have attained the status of lawful permanent resident (LPR), as evidenced by a "green card." There are many paths to securing a green card, leading to naturalization. One such path is that of an L-1A intra-company transfer visa, which allows for adjustment of status to that of an LPR and eventually naturalization.

Our law firm is well-versed in the requirements for naturalization and the various paths leading to a green card and will be pleased to guide you through the often complicated rules and regulations. We are also experienced in prosecuting administrative hearings or court actions to contest the denial of a naturalization application.

Additional Naturalization Requirements

Immigrants married to U.S. citizens must maintain their LPR status for three years before becoming eligible for naturalization. Of those three years, the immigrant must have continuously resided in the U.S. for one and a half years. For immigrants not married to U.S. citizens, the eligibility waiting period is five years, with a continuous residency requirement of two and a half years. The concept of "continuous residency" has a technical meaning, and our experienced immigration lawyers will explain it to you and help you satisfy the relevant requirements.

All immigrants seeking naturalization, whether married to a U.S. citizen or not, must additionally meet other applicable requirements, including, without limitation:

  • Being 18 years of age at the time of applying for naturalization
  • Being free of certain criminal convictions
  • Demonstrating an attachment to the ideals of the U.S. Constitution
  • Demonstrating an ability to read, write, speak and understand the English language
  • Passing a civics test on U.S. history and government
  • Taking an oath of allegiance to the U.S.

If you meet all of the qualifications for naturalization, you will need to make sure that your home country allows dual citizenship. Some countries do not allow their nationals to retain their country's citizenship if they become naturalized citizens of other countries, including the U.S. Our experienced attorneys will advise you about this potential issue whenever necessary.

Schedule Your Appointment Today

Becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen is the culmination of much effort and achievement during your time in this country. With the assistance of our experienced naturalization attorneys, you can be confident that the process will go smoothly. We are here to answer any questions you may have.

To learn more about naturalization and U.S. citizenship and to schedule an appointment, call 843-376-4085 or toll free at 888-370-5810. You may also contact us online.

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